God moves in a mysterious way : the Hungarian protestant foreign mission movement (1756-1951) / Kool A.M.

Main Author: Kool, A. M., 1957-, Anna MariaLanguage: англійська.Country: НІДЕРЛАНДИ.Publication: Zoetermeer : Uitgeverij Boekencentrum, ©1993Description: xx, 1023 p.ISBN: 90-239-0796-3; 90-239-0796-5.Series: Missiological research in the Netherlands series, no. 4Dewey: 266/.023439, 20Classification: Contents note: 1. INTRODUCTION -- 1 1.1 Recovering the Second World perspective in Mission History -- 1 1.2 State of the question -- 6 1.3 Written and oral sources -- 9 1.4 Method and structure of the study -- 12 PART ONE: BACKGROUND AND ROOTS 2. PROTESTANTISM IN THE LIFE OF HUNGARY (1711-1951) -- 21 2.1 Country and people -- 21 2.2 Reconstruction and Repression (1711 - 1781) -- 22 2.2.1 The political, social, economic and cultural situation -- 23 2.2.2 The Protestant Churches in the ’Babylonian Captivity’ (1711-1781) -- 26 2.3 Period of Reform (1782 - 1848) -- 31 2.3.1 The political, social, economic and cultural situation -- 31 2.3.2 The situation of the Protestant Churches (1782-1848) -- 36 2.4 From the revolution of 1848-49 to World War I -- 40 2.4.1 The political, social, economic and cultural situation -- 40 2.4.2 The situation of the Protestant Churches (1848-1914) -- 46 2.5 Between the World Wars (1918-1939/44) -- 54 2.5.1 The political, social, economic and cultural situation -- 54 2.5.2 The situation of the Protestant Churches (1918-1939/44) -- 60 3. ROOTS OF HUNGARIAN PROTESTANT FOREIGN MISSION AGENCIES (1756 - 1903) -- 67 3.1 Roots in the 18th century and early 19th century (1756 - 1841) -- 67 3.1.1 Nicholaus L. von Zinzendorfs influence in Hungary -- 67 3.1.2 Benjamin Sz6nyi and the Szentek Hegeduje (the violin of the Saints) -- 75 3.1.3 Gottlieb August Wimmer and the mission awakening in Fels616v6 -- 82 3.2 Roots in the middle of the 19th century -- 98 3.2.1 Maria Dorothea and the Scottish Mission -- 98 3.2.2 Tivadar Biberauer and the German speaking Reformed affiliated Church -- 111 3.2.3 Marton Czelder (1833 - 1889) and the Moldavian-Wallachian mission -- 115 3.3 Roots in late 19th century (1880 - 1903) -- 135 3.3.1 Aladar Szabo, the herald of 20th century mission awakening -- 135 3.3.2 Odon Scholtz and the Kulmisszio -- 160 3.4 Roots: final observations and perspective -- 182 PART TWO: FOREIGN MISSION AGENCIES IN HUNGARIAN PROTESTANTISM IN THE 20TH CENTURY (1903-1951) A. BEFORE WORLD WAR I (1903-1914/16) 4. HUNGARIAN EVANGELICAL CHRISTIAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY (MEKMSz) (1903 - 1914/16) -- 191 4.1 First beginnings, foundational aspects -- 191 4.1.1 Purpose -- 192 4.1.2 Mission directed to Hungarians, Jews and Muslims at the Balkans -- 193 4.1.3 Theological concept of mission -- 195 4.1.4 Mission Board -- 197 4.2 MEKMSz in its first years -- 198 4.3 Organisations comprising home base -- 199 4.3.1 Aladar Szabo and the Bethania Association -- 200 4.3.2 Mrs Roza Misley and the Mission Committee of the Hungarian Evangelical Christian Women Association -- 203 4.3.3 Janos Victor and the Hungarian Evangelical Christian Student Federation (MEKDSz) -- 206 4.4 Recruitment and instruction of missionary candidates, mission at Theological Academies -- 219 4.4.1 Missionary candidates and their recruitment -- 219 4.4.2 Instruction -- 226 4.4.3 Mission at Theological Academies -- 227 4.5 Educating and mobilizing home base for mission work -- 229 4.5.1 Tours of missionaries and visitors -- 230 4.5.2 The Hajnal and other mission literature -- 231 4.5.3 Mission festivals, charitable parties and worship services -- 233 4.5.4 Mission offering -- 234 4.5.5 Mission prayer -- 234 4.6 Mission work overseas -- 235 4.6.1 China -- 236 4.6.2 Egypt: Irma Pauer -- 240 4.7 MEKMSz’ national and international relations in context -- 242 4.7.1 MEKMSz and the Protestant Churches in Hungary -- 242 4.7.2 MEKMSz in the socio-political situation -- 247 4.7.3 International contacts -- 249 4.8 Final observations and perspective -- 251 5. HUNGARIAN LUTHERAN MISSION ASSOCIATION (1909 - 1915) (MAHEM) -- 253 5.1 First beginnings, foundational aspects -- 253 5.1.1 Purpose -- 255 5.1.2 Mission directed to Jews, Muslims at the Balkans and fields of the Leipzig Mission -- 258 5.1.3 Theological concept of mission -- 259 5.2 MAHEM in its first years -- 260 5.3 Centres of mission interest at home base -- 261 5.4 Recruitment and instruction of missionary candidates, mission at Faculty of Theology -- 264 5.4.1 Missionary candidate and his recruitment -- 264 5.4.2 Mission instruction -- 266 5.4.3 Mission at Faculty of Theology -- 267 5.5 Educating and mobilizing home base for mission work -- 267 5.5.1 Tours of visitors -- 267 5.5.2 The mission periodical Misszioi Lapok -- 268 5.5.3 Mission festivals -- 269 5.5.4 Mission offering -- 271 5.5.5 MAHEM and prayer -- 271 5.6 Mission work overseas -- 272 5.6.1 China: Adolf Hermann -- 272 5.6.2 East Africa: Henrik Roth -- 274 5.7 MAHEM’s national and international relations in context -- 276 5.7.1 MAHEM and the Lutheran Church in Hungary -- 276 5.7.2 Tense relationship between MAHEM and MEKMSz -- 279 5.7.3 MAHEM and the socio-political and economic situation -- 281 5.7.4 International contacts: Leipzig Mission -- 282 5.8 Final observations and perspective -- 283 В. BETWEEN WORLD WAR I AND II (1921 - 1939/44) 6. HUNGARIAN EVANGELICAL CHRISTIAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY, LATER HUNGARIAN REFORMED FOREIGN MISSION SOCIETY (MRKSz) (1921 -1944) -- 285 6.1 Refoundation, foundational aspects -- 285 6.1.1 Purpose -- 287 6.1.2 Mission fields -- 288 6.1.2.1 Liebenzell Mission: China and Admiral Islands (Manus) -- 288 6.1.2.2 Eastward: Russian Mission -- 289 6.1.2.3 Eastward: Muslims at the Balkans -- 293 6.1.2.4 Reformed Confessional fields: Dutch East Indies -- 294 6.1.2.5 Final observations and perspective -- 295 6.1.3. Theological concepts of mission -- 296 6.2 Development of work, overview -- 352 6.3 Organisations, groups and congregations comprising home base -- 358 6.3.1 Sandor Csia and Beni Szikszai and the Bethania Association -- 359 6.3.2 Mrs Roza Misley and the Mission Committee of the Women’s Association -- 363 6.3.3 Evangelical Christian Student Federation MEKDSz Pro Christo -- 365 6.3.4 Supporting local groups and congregations -- 388 6.4. Recruitment and instruction of missionary candidates, mission at Theological Academies -- 395 6.4.1 Missionary candidates and their recruitment -- 395 6.4.2 Instruction and training: MRKSz Missionary Training school (1942) -- 410 6.4.3 Mission at the Theological Academies -- 414 6.5 Educating and mobilizing home base for mission work -- 422 6.5.1 Tours of missionaries, visitors, travelling secretaries -- 424 6.5.2 Hajnal, Misszidi Fuzetek, RKSz other mission literature -- 427 6.5.3 Mission conferences and foreign mission days -- 435 6.5.4 Mission offering -- 439 6.5.5 Mission Prayer -- 445 6.6 Mission work abroad -- 447 6.6.1 China -- 449 6.6.2 Admiral Islands (Manus) -- 461 6.6.3 Mission at the Balkans -- 470 6.6.4 The Dutch East Indies (Indonesia) -- 498 6.7. MEKMSz/MRKSz national and international relations in context -- 515 6.7.1 Relation of MEKMSz/MRKSz to the Reformed Church of Hungary -- 515 6.7.2 Relation to MAHEM and the Lutheran Church -- 539 6.7.3 MEKMSz/MRKSz in the social, political and economic situation -- 540 6.7.4 Relation to Hungarian churches in Rumania, Czechoslowakia and Yugoslavia -- 542 6.7.5 International relations with Liebenzell Mission in Germany and other Mission societies -- 550 6.7.6 Relations to IMC -- 552 6.8 Final observations and perspective -- 553 7. HUNGARIAN LUTHERAN MISSION ASSOCIATION (MAHEM) (1921 - 1944) -- 559 7.1 Refoundation, foundational aspects -- 559 7.1.1 Purpose -- 560 7.1.2 Mission fields -- 562 7.1.2.1 Leipzig Mission -- 562 7.1.2.2 Eastward: directed to related peoples at the Balkans (Turks) and Russia -- 563 7.1.2.3 Finnish Mission fields: China -- 565 7.1.3 Theological concepts of mission -- 568 7.1.4 Mission Council -- 578 7.2 Development of work, overview -- 580 7.3 Organisations, groups and congregations comprising home base -- 584 7.3.1 Evangelical Christian Student Federation MEKDSz Pro Christo -- 584 7.3.2 Bethania Association -- 587 7.3.3 Lutheran Deaconess Association Phebe -- 590 7.3.4 The Fraternal movement (Bardti mozgalom) -- 594 7.3.5 Supporting groups within MAHEM -- 598 7.4 Recruitment and instruction of missionary candidates, mission at Faculty of Theology -- 603 7.4.1 Missionary candidates and their recruitment -- 603 7.4.2 Instruction and training: the Samuel Tessedik Youth Mission 7.4.3 Missions at Faculty of Theology in Sopron -- 612 7.5 Educating and mobilizing home base for mission work -- 614 7.5.1 Tours of missionaries and visitors -- 615 7.5.2 Misszioi Lapok and other (foreign) mission literature -- 623 7.5.3 Mission conferences -- 625 7.5.4 Mission offering -- 628 7.5.5 Mission Prayer -- 629 7.6 Mission work overseas -- 631 7.7 MAHEM’s national and international relations in context -- 640 7.7.1 MAHEM and the Lutheran church of Hungary -- 640 7.7.2 Relation of MAHEM to MEKMSz/MRKSz -- 650 7.7.3 MAHEM and the social, political and economic situation -- 650 7.7.4 International contacts with Germany (Leipzig Mission) and Finland (Finnish Missionary Society) -- 652 7.7.5 Ecumenical movement -- 656 7.8 Final observations and perspective -- 656 8. HUNGARIAN REFORMED FOREIGN MISSION SOCIETY (1945 - 1949) -- 661 8.1 Refoundation, foundational aspects -- 661 8.1.1 Purpose -- 664 8.1.2 Mission fields -- 665 8.1.2.1 Liebenzell Mission: mission on Manus -- 665 8.1.2.2 Eastward: mission directed to Turks and to Russia -- 666 8.1.2.3 Reformed Confessional field: the Dutch East Indies (Indonesia) -- 667 8.1.3 Theological concepts of mission -- 674 8.1.4 Mission Board -- 705 8.2 Development of work, overview -- 706 8.3 Congregations and organisations comprising home base -- 713 8.4 Recruitment and instruction of missionary candidates, mission at the Theological Academies -- 715 8.4.1 Missionary candidates and their recruitment -- 716 8.4.2 Instruction and training: Reformed Foreign Mission Missionary 8.4.3 Mission at the Theological Academies -- 742 8.5 Educating and mobilizing home base for mission work -- 745 8.5.1 Tours of visitors Johannes C. Hoekendijk, Raden Soedarma, travelling secretary and missionary candidates -- 747 8.5.2 Hajnal, Misszioi Fuzetek, other foreign mission literature -- 754 8.5.3 Mission conferences and foreign mission days -- 756 8.5.4 Mission offering: great expectations, and severe setbacks -- 758 8.5.5 Mission Prayer -- 761 8.6 Mission work abroad -- 764 8.6.1 China: Sandor Babos and Maria Babos nee Lorincz -- 764 8.6.2 Admiral Islands, Manus: Maria Molnar -- 766 8.6.3 Mission at the Balkans: Albania -- 769 8.6.4 Indonesia (formerly the Dutch East Indies) -- 770 8.7 MRKSz’s national and international relations in context -- 775 8.7.1 MRKSz and the Reformed Church of Hungary -- 775 8.7.2 MRKSz in the social, political and economic situation after World War II -- 796 8.7.3 International contacts with the Netherlands Missionary Council -- 798 8.8 Final observations and perspective -- 804 9. HUNGARIAN LUTHERAN MISSION ASSOCIATION (1945 - 1951) -- 807 9.1 Refoundation, foundational aspects -- 807 9.1.1 Purpose -- 810 9.1.2 Mission fields -- 812 9.1.2.1 Leipzig Mission and Finnish Missionary Society -- 812 9.1.2.2 Mission directed to Muslims, Jews and Gypsies -- 813 9.1.3 Theological concepts of mission -- 817 9.1.4 Mission Council -- 826 9.2 Development of work, overview -- 826 9.3 Congregations, groups and organisations comprising home base -- 827 9.4 Recruitment and instruction of missionary candidates, mission at Faculty of Theology -- 829 9.4.1 Missionary candidates and their recruitment -- 830 9.4.2 Mission School in Nagytarcsa (later Gyarmat utca 14) -- 836 9.4.3 Missionary Working group at Lutheran Faculty of Theology in Sopron -- 845 9.5 Educating and mobilizing home base for mission work -- 847 9.5.1 Tours of travelling secretaries and visitor Johannes C. Hoekendijk -- 848 9.5.2 Misszioi Lapok and other mission literature -- 851 9.5.3 Mission festivals, conferences and foreign mission days -- 852 9.5.4 Mission offering: spirit of repentance and signs of hope -- 853 9.5.5 Mission prayer: significant growth of responsibility -- 855 9.6 Mission work abroad -- 856 9.7 MAHEM’s national and international relations in context -- 860 9.7.1 MAHEM and the Lutheran Church of Hungary -- 861 9.7.2 Relation of MAHEM to MRKSz -- 880 9.7.3 MAHEM and the socio-political and economic situation -- 881 9.7.4 International contacts: Scandinavian countries -- 881 9.8 Final observations and perspective -- 882 10. CLOSING OBSERVATIONS AND PERSPECTIVE -- 885 1 Constitutions of MEKMSz (1903) and MAHEM (1909) -- 895 2 Statements: -- 903 -- 905 -- 911 3 List of Missionaries and Missionary Candidates -- 925 4 List of members of Mission Boards -- 933 Sources A Archives -- 939 В Oral sources -- 943 C Periodical Missionary and Church Publications -- 946 D Select Bibliography and Reference List -- 948 Abbreviations -- 982 Indexes 1 Index of Authors and Personal Names -- 985 2 Index of Geographical Names -- 997 3 Index of Subjects -- 1001 Concordance of Geographical Names (Hungarian and German) -- 1007 Osszefoglalas [Summary in Hungarian] -- 1011 Samenvatting [Summary in Dutch] -- 1017 Abstract: Anna Maria Kool's exhaustive study of the Hungarian Protestant mission movement is a monument to intensive research and is certain to endure without competition. Taking a subject of relatively limited interest, scope, and duration, the author manages to treat it with sufficient breadth and penetration to make it come alive. Her stated aim is to examine, critically and systematically, the activities of Hungarian mission agencies in the first half of the twentieth century and their place in the life of Hungarian Reformed and Lutheran churches. The uniqueness of her endeavor is its focus on a "Second World" country and the relative inaccessibility of the material she includes to all but Hungarian-speaking scholars. For reviving the lapsed memory of a once-thriving though quite immature Hungarian missionary tradition, Hungarian Protestants will remain in the author's debt. .Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references and indexes..Subject - Topical Name: Missions, Hungarian -- History | Protestant churches -- Missions -- History Item type: Книги
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Бібліотека Українського Гуманітарного Інституту
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284 / K73 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available (Немає обмежень доступу) 41683-003348

Summary in Dutch and Hungarian.

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

1. INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Recovering the Second World perspective in Mission History 1 1.2 State of the question 6 1.3 Written and oral sources 9 1.4 Method and structure of the study 12 PART ONE: BACKGROUND AND ROOTS 2. PROTESTANTISM IN THE LIFE OF HUNGARY (1711-1951) 21 2.1 Country and people 21 2.2 Reconstruction and Repression (1711 - 1781) 22 2.2.1 The political, social, economic and cultural situation 23 2.2.2 The Protestant Churches in the ’Babylonian Captivity’ (1711-1781) 26 2.3 Period of Reform (1782 - 1848) 31 2.3.1 The political, social, economic and cultural situation 31 2.3.2 The situation of the Protestant Churches (1782-1848) 36 2.4 From the revolution of 1848-49 to World War I 40 2.4.1 The political, social, economic and cultural situation 40 2.4.2 The situation of the Protestant Churches (1848-1914) 46 2.5 Between the World Wars (1918-1939/44) 54 2.5.1 The political, social, economic and cultural situation 54 2.5.2 The situation of the Protestant Churches (1918-1939/44) 60 3. ROOTS OF HUNGARIAN PROTESTANT FOREIGN MISSION AGENCIES (1756 - 1903) 67 3.1 Roots in the 18th century and early 19th century (1756 - 1841) 67 3.1.1 Nicholaus L. von Zinzendorfs influence in Hungary 67 3.1.2 Benjamin Sz6nyi and the Szentek Hegeduje (the violin of the Saints) 75 3.1.3 Gottlieb August Wimmer and the mission awakening in Fels616v6 82 3.2 Roots in the middle of the 19th century 98 3.2.1 Maria Dorothea and the Scottish Mission 98 3.2.2 Tivadar Biberauer and the German speaking Reformed affiliated Church 111 3.2.3 Marton Czelder (1833 - 1889) and the Moldavian-Wallachian mission 115 3.3 Roots in late 19th century (1880 - 1903) 135 3.3.1 Aladar Szabo, the herald of 20th century mission awakening 135 3.3.2 Odon Scholtz and the Kulmisszio 160 3.4 Roots: final observations and perspective 182 PART TWO: FOREIGN MISSION AGENCIES IN HUNGARIAN PROTESTANTISM IN THE 20TH CENTURY (1903-1951) A. BEFORE WORLD WAR I (1903-1914/16) 4. HUNGARIAN EVANGELICAL CHRISTIAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY (MEKMSz) (1903 - 1914/16) 191 4.1 First beginnings, foundational aspects 191 4.1.1 Purpose 192 4.1.2 Mission directed to Hungarians, Jews and Muslims at the Balkans 193 4.1.3 Theological concept of mission 195 4.1.4 Mission Board 197 4.2 MEKMSz in its first years 198 4.3 Organisations comprising home base 199 4.3.1 Aladar Szabo and the Bethania Association 200 4.3.2 Mrs Roza Misley and the Mission Committee of the Hungarian Evangelical Christian Women Association 203 4.3.3 Janos Victor and the Hungarian Evangelical Christian Student Federation (MEKDSz) 206 4.4 Recruitment and instruction of missionary candidates, mission at Theological Academies 219 4.4.1 Missionary candidates and their recruitment 219 4.4.2 Instruction 226 4.4.3 Mission at Theological Academies 227 4.5 Educating and mobilizing home base for mission work 229 4.5.1 Tours of missionaries and visitors 230 4.5.2 The Hajnal and other mission literature 231 4.5.3 Mission festivals, charitable parties and worship services 233 4.5.4 Mission offering 234 4.5.5 Mission prayer 234 4.6 Mission work overseas 235 4.6.1 China 236 4.6.2 Egypt: Irma Pauer 240 4.7 MEKMSz’ national and international relations in context 242 4.7.1 MEKMSz and the Protestant Churches in Hungary 242 4.7.2 MEKMSz in the socio-political situation 247 4.7.3 International contacts 249 4.8 Final observations and perspective 251 5. HUNGARIAN LUTHERAN MISSION ASSOCIATION (1909 - 1915) (MAHEM) 253 5.1 First beginnings, foundational aspects 253 5.1.1 Purpose 255 5.1.2 Mission directed to Jews, Muslims at the Balkans and fields of the Leipzig Mission 258 5.1.3 Theological concept of mission 259 5.2 MAHEM in its first years 260 5.3 Centres of mission interest at home base 261 5.4 Recruitment and instruction of missionary candidates, mission at Faculty of Theology 264 5.4.1 Missionary candidate and his recruitment 264 5.4.2 Mission instruction 266 5.4.3 Mission at Faculty of Theology 267 5.5 Educating and mobilizing home base for mission work 267 5.5.1 Tours of visitors 267 5.5.2 The mission periodical Misszioi Lapok 268 5.5.3 Mission festivals 269 5.5.4 Mission offering 271 5.5.5 MAHEM and prayer 271 5.6 Mission work overseas 272 5.6.1 China: Adolf Hermann 272 5.6.2 East Africa: Henrik Roth 274 5.7 MAHEM’s national and international relations in context 276 5.7.1 MAHEM and the Lutheran Church in Hungary 276 5.7.2 Tense relationship between MAHEM and MEKMSz 279 5.7.3 MAHEM and the socio-political and economic situation 281 5.7.4 International contacts: Leipzig Mission 282 5.8 Final observations and perspective 283 В. BETWEEN WORLD WAR I AND II (1921 - 1939/44) 6. HUNGARIAN EVANGELICAL CHRISTIAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY, LATER HUNGARIAN REFORMED FOREIGN MISSION SOCIETY (MRKSz) (1921 -1944) 285 6.1 Refoundation, foundational aspects 285 6.1.1 Purpose 287 6.1.2 Mission fields 288 6.1.2.1 Liebenzell Mission: China and Admiral Islands (Manus) 288 6.1.2.2 Eastward: Russian Mission 289 6.1.2.3 Eastward: Muslims at the Balkans 293 6.1.2.4 Reformed Confessional fields: Dutch East Indies 294 6.1.2.5 Final observations and perspective 295 6.1.3. Theological concepts of mission 296 6.2 Development of work, overview 352 6.3 Organisations, groups and congregations comprising home base 358 6.3.1 Sandor Csia and Beni Szikszai and the Bethania Association 359 6.3.2 Mrs Roza Misley and the Mission Committee of the Women’s Association 363 6.3.3 Evangelical Christian Student Federation MEKDSz Pro Christo 365 6.3.4 Supporting local groups and congregations 388 6.4. Recruitment and instruction of missionary candidates, mission at Theological Academies 395 6.4.1 Missionary candidates and their recruitment 395 6.4.2 Instruction and training: MRKSz Missionary Training school (1942) 410 6.4.3 Mission at the Theological Academies 414 6.5 Educating and mobilizing home base for mission work 422 6.5.1 Tours of missionaries, visitors, travelling secretaries 424 6.5.2 Hajnal, Misszidi Fuzetek, RKSz other mission literature 427 6.5.3 Mission conferences and foreign mission days 435 6.5.4 Mission offering 439 6.5.5 Mission Prayer 445 6.6 Mission work abroad 447 6.6.1 China 449 6.6.2 Admiral Islands (Manus) 461 6.6.3 Mission at the Balkans 470 6.6.4 The Dutch East Indies (Indonesia) 498 6.7. MEKMSz/MRKSz national and international relations in context 515 6.7.1 Relation of MEKMSz/MRKSz to the Reformed Church of Hungary 515 6.7.2 Relation to MAHEM and the Lutheran Church 539 6.7.3 MEKMSz/MRKSz in the social, political and economic situation 540 6.7.4 Relation to Hungarian churches in Rumania, Czechoslowakia and Yugoslavia 542 6.7.5 International relations with Liebenzell Mission in Germany and other Mission societies 550 6.7.6 Relations to IMC 552 6.8 Final observations and perspective 553 7. HUNGARIAN LUTHERAN MISSION ASSOCIATION (MAHEM) (1921 - 1944) 559 7.1 Refoundation, foundational aspects 559 7.1.1 Purpose 560 7.1.2 Mission fields 562 7.1.2.1 Leipzig Mission 562 7.1.2.2 Eastward: directed to related peoples at the Balkans (Turks) and Russia 563 7.1.2.3 Finnish Mission fields: China 565 7.1.3 Theological concepts of mission 568 7.1.4 Mission Council 578 7.2 Development of work, overview 580 7.3 Organisations, groups and congregations comprising home base 584 7.3.1 Evangelical Christian Student Federation MEKDSz Pro Christo 584 7.3.2 Bethania Association 587 7.3.3 Lutheran Deaconess Association Phebe 590 7.3.4 The Fraternal movement (Bardti mozgalom) 594 7.3.5 Supporting groups within MAHEM 598 7.4 Recruitment and instruction of missionary candidates, mission at Faculty of Theology 603 7.4.1 Missionary candidates and their recruitment 603 7.4.2 Instruction and training: the Samuel Tessedik Youth Mission 7.4.3 Missions at Faculty of Theology in Sopron 612 7.5 Educating and mobilizing home base for mission work 614 7.5.1 Tours of missionaries and visitors 615 7.5.2 Misszioi Lapok and other (foreign) mission literature 623 7.5.3 Mission conferences 625 7.5.4 Mission offering 628 7.5.5 Mission Prayer 629 7.6 Mission work overseas 631 7.7 MAHEM’s national and international relations in context 640 7.7.1 MAHEM and the Lutheran church of Hungary 640 7.7.2 Relation of MAHEM to MEKMSz/MRKSz 650 7.7.3 MAHEM and the social, political and economic situation 650 7.7.4 International contacts with Germany (Leipzig Mission) and Finland (Finnish Missionary Society) 652 7.7.5 Ecumenical movement 656 7.8 Final observations and perspective 656 8. HUNGARIAN REFORMED FOREIGN MISSION SOCIETY (1945 - 1949) 661 8.1 Refoundation, foundational aspects 661 8.1.1 Purpose 664 8.1.2 Mission fields 665 8.1.2.1 Liebenzell Mission: mission on Manus 665 8.1.2.2 Eastward: mission directed to Turks and to Russia 666 8.1.2.3 Reformed Confessional field: the Dutch East Indies (Indonesia) 667 8.1.3 Theological concepts of mission 674 8.1.4 Mission Board 705 8.2 Development of work, overview 706 8.3 Congregations and organisations comprising home base 713 8.4 Recruitment and instruction of missionary candidates, mission at the Theological Academies 715 8.4.1 Missionary candidates and their recruitment 716 8.4.2 Instruction and training: Reformed Foreign Mission Missionary 8.4.3 Mission at the Theological Academies 742 8.5 Educating and mobilizing home base for mission work 745 8.5.1 Tours of visitors Johannes C. Hoekendijk, Raden Soedarma, travelling secretary and missionary candidates 747 8.5.2 Hajnal, Misszioi Fuzetek, other foreign mission literature 754 8.5.3 Mission conferences and foreign mission days 756 8.5.4 Mission offering: great expectations, and severe setbacks 758 8.5.5 Mission Prayer 761 8.6 Mission work abroad 764 8.6.1 China: Sandor Babos and Maria Babos nee Lorincz 764 8.6.2 Admiral Islands, Manus: Maria Molnar 766 8.6.3 Mission at the Balkans: Albania 769 8.6.4 Indonesia (formerly the Dutch East Indies) 770 8.7 MRKSz’s national and international relations in context 775 8.7.1 MRKSz and the Reformed Church of Hungary 775 8.7.2 MRKSz in the social, political and economic situation after World War II 796 8.7.3 International contacts with the Netherlands Missionary Council 798 8.8 Final observations and perspective 804 9. HUNGARIAN LUTHERAN MISSION ASSOCIATION (1945 - 1951) 807 9.1 Refoundation, foundational aspects 807 9.1.1 Purpose 810 9.1.2 Mission fields 812 9.1.2.1 Leipzig Mission and Finnish Missionary Society 812 9.1.2.2 Mission directed to Muslims, Jews and Gypsies 813 9.1.3 Theological concepts of mission 817 9.1.4 Mission Council 826 9.2 Development of work, overview 826 9.3 Congregations, groups and organisations comprising home base 827 9.4 Recruitment and instruction of missionary candidates, mission at Faculty of Theology 829 9.4.1 Missionary candidates and their recruitment 830 9.4.2 Mission School in Nagytarcsa (later Gyarmat utca 14) 836 9.4.3 Missionary Working group at Lutheran Faculty of Theology in Sopron 845 9.5 Educating and mobilizing home base for mission work 847 9.5.1 Tours of travelling secretaries and visitor Johannes C. Hoekendijk 848 9.5.2 Misszioi Lapok and other mission literature 851 9.5.3 Mission festivals, conferences and foreign mission days 852 9.5.4 Mission offering: spirit of repentance and signs of hope 853 9.5.5 Mission prayer: significant growth of responsibility 855 9.6 Mission work abroad 856 9.7 MAHEM’s national and international relations in context 860 9.7.1 MAHEM and the Lutheran Church of Hungary 861 9.7.2 Relation of MAHEM to MRKSz 880 9.7.3 MAHEM and the socio-political and economic situation 881 9.7.4 International contacts: Scandinavian countries 881 9.8 Final observations and perspective 882 10. CLOSING OBSERVATIONS AND PERSPECTIVE 885 1 Constitutions of MEKMSz (1903) and MAHEM (1909) 895 2 Statements: a. Ordinances for candidates of Hungarian Student Volunteer Movement (1912) 903 b. Articles of Church Constitutions of the Reformed and Lutheran Church in Hungary concerning the mission work of the church 905 c. Mission Ordinances of the Reformed (1931) and Lutheran (1942) Church 911 3 List of Missionaries and Missionary Candidates 925 4 List of members of Mission Boards 933 Sources A Archives 939 В Oral sources 943 C Periodical Missionary and Church Publications 946 D Select Bibliography and Reference List 948 Abbreviations 982 Indexes 1 Index of Authors and Personal Names 985 2 Index of Geographical Names 997 3 Index of Subjects 1001 Concordance of Geographical Names (Hungarian and German) 1007 Osszefoglalas [Summary in Hungarian] 1011 Samenvatting [Summary in Dutch] 1017

Anna Maria Kool's exhaustive study of the Hungarian Protestant mission movement is a monument to intensive research and is certain to endure without competition. Taking a subject of relatively limited interest, scope, and duration, the author manages to treat it with sufficient breadth and penetration to make it come alive. Her stated aim is to examine, critically and systematically, the activities of Hungarian mission agencies in the first half of the twentieth century and their place in the life of Hungarian Reformed and Lutheran churches. The uniqueness of her endeavor is its focus on a "Second World" country and the relative inaccessibility of the material she includes to all but Hungarian-speaking scholars. For reviving the lapsed memory of a once-thriving though quite immature Hungarian missionary tradition, Hungarian Protestants will remain in the author's debt.

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